What does an Emergency Nurse Practitioner (ENP) do?

By Yasmine Hachem

What does an Emergency Nurse Practitioner (ENP) do?

​What does an Emergency Nurse Practitioner (ENP) do?

What is an ENP?

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Emergency nurse practitioners (ENP) are often unheard-of despite playing a vital role in the healthcare industry. This role provides qualified nurses with the opportunity to develop their expertise through further training. Specialised training allows them to care for patients across a variety of ages and treat injuries without the need for a doctor. Emergency nurse practitioners (ENP) often help reduce waiting times and pressure off other members of the team which provides a better quality of care for patients.

Where does an ENP work?

Besides working in A&E, ENPs could also be placed in trauma centres, Urgent Care Centres, or ambulances.

What does an ENP do?

The role of an emergency nurse practitioner (ENP) involves the ability to assess, diagnose, treat, and discharge patients. The role might also involve:

·      Reading and assessing X-rays

·      Giving injections and administrating medication

·      Recording and analysing ECG examinations,

·      Carrying out wound, burn or scald treatments

·      Dealing with patient discharges

·      Diagnosing sprains, strains, cuts and bites

 

How to become an ENP?

As mentioned above, in order to become an emergency nurse practitioner, you must already be a registered nurse.

If you are a registered nurse looking to become an emergency nurse practitioner, you will need to complete a master’s degree or a doctoral degree. The majority of ENP training usually takes place on the job but these programmes often require years of experience before progressing although this is not always the case.

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